In old times there where several ways how work with yeast. Some where repitching their yeast on and on and got some really stable cultures (kveik), some of them where drying them on wood to prolong shelf live. Besides pitching it again and again you could also buy yeast in the 17th century from other breweries. So it is quite odd that Goslar still where fermenting their beer spontaneous without adding yeast. Here are some sources that state that Gose was produced without adding Yeast: Goslarsche Zeitung 1882 Since the beer was not inoculated, the fermentation happened by itself or a thick layer of mold developed. The thicker the leather like skin was the better the beer was keeping since[…]

The next one is one of the biggest sources I found beside a book about the brewing history of Goslar. The source for this one is a Goslar newspaper from 1882 and was written in 1869. A fellow homebrewer posted this on his website. In order to preserve the brewing practise of the Goslarsche Gose I take the opportunity to document it. Over 40 years the brewing practise of the Gose was not observed and only a few persons know about it. In order to explain it some details have to be mentioned before. As you know there are 301 sanctioned brewing entities in Goslar. In old times the same amount of brewhouses where there. In the year 1790 there[…]

This recipe is from “Journal von und für Deutschland” from Sigmund Bibra written in 1791. Since it is prepared so differently the making of the Gose deserves some comment. The grain used is solely wheat and the more pure, plump and beatiful the better the malt and beer will get. The amount should never be under three and a half Wispel. In order to tame the sweetness of the wheat and to prevent the beer from getting sour some Scheffel of Hops should be added. The malt is never kilned but germinated and dried under the free air. It need a lot of care to create the malt always in the same quality. The owner has to watch it day[…]

The next recipe I found earlier but it references the first recipe before. It was published in the Book: “Die Naturgeschichte und Bergwerksverfassung des Ober-Harzes” from Johann Friedrich Zückert written in 1762. Übersetzung Rezept White beer is brewed on other places and these are called Gose. These should be called wrong Gose because they are not brewed with the Gose water and are not able to come near the Gose from Goslar in taste and quality. The real gose, that is better then those false gose, is unknown to most people since it is hard to transport. I dont want to overpraise this admirable wheat beer. It deserves however that I describe it’s character and the way it is prepared.[…]

From the book Cervisia Goslariensi (1735) which is by the way nearly impossible to find via google … I got the following Recipe: The beer from goslar is prepared as following: The malt is weighed and thrown and well sieved that it is clear, after that clear water water will be added. After the malt is dry or damp and therefore is lauter malt a sample needs to be send to the to the brewing office in order to check it. To beginn with the 4 pans (which are more like brew kettles) are filled with hot water. On every pan there is added some milled grain. From these, two will be added to the mash tun (mast bütte) together with[…]

While I’m searching for Gose and Berliner Weisse in old Books I’m finding also references to other beer styles that I really like, one of them is Lichtenhainer. In a nice book called “Enzyklopädie der technischen Chemie” from 1915 I found some nice info about Lichtenhainer. (This info & data is based on analyses and observations around 1910 so it could all been different 100 years ago) Lichtenhainer beer is a slight sour, pale beer tasting smokey. It is similar to the Berliner Weisse but has a low level of carbonation. It is produced from smoked barley malt and gets is slightly sour taste not from the main fermentation but develops afterwards through an infection with lactic acid bacteria. These Bacteria[…]

Getting amounts of malt and specific gravity is a lot harder. I found only one value for Goslarsche Gose which was from 1858 but two others for Döllnitzer Gose which was close to Goslarsche. After that I found a lot of other data points for Döllnitzer but the problem with them was that the readings were taken around 1900 and they get a lot lower than the first ones. I contribute that to the state of the economy and maybe taste at that time. What is a common Scheme you see is the high finishing gravity. With an apparent degree of attenuation around 60% it is not your typical sour beer like Berliner Weisse or Lambic. For my recreation I will settle at 13[…]

My Goal is to recreate a somewhat historic acurate version of Goslarsche or Dölnitzer Gose for Carnival Brettanomyces and I will post my progress here. Malt is where every beer starts. Let’s see what different sources say about the Malt in historical Gose from Goslar: Heinrich Steckhahn writes 1869 in a Newspaper from Goslar: The Wheat was bough from the production director (Gose was brewed solely from pure wheat malt).  This wheat was delivered to the active brewing houses for malting … So this source says Gose was only brewed with wheat. (Full Source available here) The next recipe source from 1762 does not mention anything about the malt in particular. It just says it is a “Weizenbier” and that in[…]

As my german sour beer research continues I found some really interesting facts about Gose. From a newspaper article from 1882 there is the following: „There is no yeast pitched into the beer. Due to that fact a thick layer of mold builds on top of it. The thicker this leather like layer gets the better the stability of the beer. The reason for that is that the mold layer blocks oxygen from getting into the beer. Only when the beer is given away yeast is pitched.“ That Gose stems from spontaneous fermentation is nothing new but a leather like layer sounds quite interesting. There is also talk that a second fermentation took place in long necked bottles and the rising[…]

Hello fellow blog readers, there will be some changes to the blog. I decided to focus it more on my research about old German Styles. Actual my interests are on Berliner Weisse and Gosslarsche/Dölnitzer Gose. I will change the language of the blog to english in order to appeal to a bigger audience. Cheers